Sunday, 15 July 2018

POSTER WORKSHOP 1968-1971



It’s been a heck of a few days for protest in the UK, and the invention of new swearwords, with many individual eye-catching homemade placards displayed among the bulk printed ones supplied by various organisations and groups, thanks to Trump’s visit.

If this was still the late 60s, volunteers at the Poster Workshop in Camden Town would’ve been rushed off their radical feet. Inspired by Ateliers Populaires, set up by students and artists in French art school printmaking studios, the Poster Workshop opened at 61 Camden Road in 1968 and operated an open-door policy where people could print their own posters. Volunteers would show them how and collaborate, if required, to design the work. Customers would pay whatever they could afford for materials and the shop survived on donations.

Examples of these posters can be found in Poster Workshop 1968-1971, a new book documenting the struggles and graphic design of that era: everything from the war in Vietnam, apartheid in South Africa, factory closures, industrial disputes and greedy landlords to the boycotting of Californian grapes. Some of the designs are little more than to-the-point basic scrawls, others more impressive, but all display a commitment and fighting spirit for change.

Poster Workshop 1968-1971 is published by Four Corners Irregulars, £10. 






Friday, 6 July 2018

THE PRIMITIVES at the 100 CLUB, LONDON


Tracy Tracy is, unusually, perched on a stool singing a three-song interlude as the Primitives drop a gear from their usual high speed throttle. “And I'll be there just with my eyes, And that’s the way it is, And I don't want anything to change.”

‘Don’t Want Anything To Change’, featured on the Prims breakthrough LP, Lovely, being commemorated with a series of shows to mark its 30th anniversary. Unlike five years ago in the same venue, it’s not being played beginning-to-end in its entirety, but most of the tracks get an airing, taking up roughly half the set.

Some things have changed, like the introduction of a mid-set sit-down, but not many. They rattle through, they hit a groove, there’s a roughness that echoes their pre-major label success and the rusty chainsaw scuzz of their early indie days. I’d love to say I saw them playing to ten grebos and a dog in Coventry flophouse, flogging singles out the boot of a car, but that’s not the case. They were already at their commercial peak when I first saw them, selling 3000 tickets for two nights at London’s Town and Country Club at the end of ’87. 

My main memory of that night, apart from me impersonating a leaping salmon at the front of the stage to ‘Spacehead’ and ‘Nothing Left’, is those eyes Tracy sings about. She didn’t move about all that much, an opening of a hand, a bend of the knees, but would seduce the audience with a look. Lure them in, then chew them up and spit them out like a bad taste. 

As a teenager then, the thought of still seeing the Prims 30 years later would’ve seemed ridiculous. Can you imagine how shit they’d be? Bunch of embarrassing old codgers. Yet, mercifully, they’ve retained their sense of style and haven’t forgotten what made them so great in the first place: tasty sweet and sour pop nuggets. 

Tracy’s a far friendly proposition these days and a more confident performer. All eyes remain on her as she spins and sashays around the stage. Forever the star, in a glittering dress so dazzling drummer Tig requires sunglasses as he cracks the snare with increasing ferocity to the opening gunshots of ‘Sick of It’. “Don't say you're having fun, There's no fire in your sun, There's nothing here that is real, Nothing that I'd stay here for, Nothing I'd like to steal, And I'm sick of it all,” she sings.

Au contraire Tracy, au contraire mon petits pois… We are most certainly having fun, mon petits pois. With each song the decibel level of audience reaction moves up a notch to near frenzy level. I’ve seen many Primitives shows since their 2009 reunion but tonight’s atmosphere is extra special. Even Tracy confesses to being emotional. Not only are favourites from Lovely greeted as old returning heroes but recent releases - the dizzying, sped-up Monkees-style ‘Petals’ and the barnstorming ‘I’ll Trust The Wind’ – are embraced with the same passionate response. The Primitives, and their followers, remember the past but aren't stuck there, they celebrate the now. 

'Crash' will forever be The Biggie. In 'Crash', so the song goes, people aren't listening anymore, they've had enough to last a lifetime through. None of those folks are in the 100 Club.  



EPILOGUE



One additional thing that made the night for me was the opportunity to play some 45s around The Primitives and support band Young Romance (who’ve taken up the mantle of fuzzy and snappy two-minute hook laden pop tunes, check out their fab single ‘Pale’). Huge thanks to the Prims and promotors AGMP and all those who kindly took the trouble to say hello, say nice things and ask for great records (none of which I had with me but demonstrated fine taste…). Here’s the list for those who like lists…



Comet Gain – An Arcade From The Warm Rain That Falls

Huggy Bear – Her Jazz
The Liminanas – Garden of Love
Psychic TV – Godstar
Rolling Stones – Dandelion
Jim Doval & the Gauchos – Mama Keep Your Big Mouth Shut
The Duals – Shift Stick
Richard Berry& the Pharaohs – Have Love Will Travel
The Stooges – Down On The Street
Primal Scream – Ivy Ivy Ivy
Birdland – Hollow Heart
Shop Assistants – Safety Net
Buzzcocks – Promises
The Velvet Underground – Foggy Notion

Young Romance

The Arrows – Blues Theme
Mouse & The Traps – Cryin’ Inside
The Byrds – Feel A Whole Lot Better
Brenda Lee – What’d I Say
The Shirelles – Boys
Shadows of Knight – Shake
Ann-Margret – It’s A Nice World To Visit (But Not To Live In)
Little Ann – Who Are You Trying To Fool
Big Maybelle – 96 Tears
Ann Sexton – You’ve Been Gone Too Long
Madeline Bell – Don’t Cross Over To My Side of the Street
Julie Driscoll, Brian Auger & the Trinity – A Kind of Love In
The Kinks – She’s Got Everything
Love – 7 and 7 Is
The Lornettes – Something To Remember Me By
The Marvelettes – Locking Up My Heart
The Marvelettes – I’ll Keep Holding On

The Primitives

Ramones – I Don’t’ Care
Johnny Thunders & the Heartbreakers – Chinese Rocks
Hollywood Brats – Sick On You
13th Floor Elevators – You’re Gonna Miss Me
Hamilton Streetcar – Invisible People
The Left Banke – I Haven’t Got The Nerve
The Who – Dogs
Billy Young – Glendora
Dee Dee Sharp – Deep Dark Secret
Gloria Grey – It’s A Sweet World
Martha & the Vandellas – In My Lonely Room
The Choir – It’s Cold Outside
Mark Markham & the Jesters – Marlboro Country
The Masters Apprentices – War or Hands of Time
The Stairs – Flying Machine
Felt – Rain of Crystal Spires